Jill Berelowitz

Sculptor

‘His Mind’s Eye Tree’ Sculpted by Jill Berelowitz Shortlisted for The PMSA Marsh Award For Excellence In Public Sculpture

AnnouncementJill Berelowitz
Jill Berelowitz - His MInd's Eye.jpg

'His Mind’s Eye Tree' sculpted by Jill Berelowitz has been shortlisted for the PMSA Marsh Award for Excellence in Public Sculpture.

Shakespeare Birthplace Trust commissioned the 4.5 mt x 5.5mt bronze tree to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare as the centrepiece of New Place at Stratford-upon-Avon.

Jill lives and works in London and is honoured and thrilled to be shortlisted for this prestigious award.

LAPADA Fine Art Fair | 15 – 20 September | The Linda Blackstone Gallery - Stand B11

ExhibitionJill Berelowitz

Delighted to exhibit 'Tree of Dreams' at the prestigious and exclusive Lapada Fine Art Fair , courtesy of The Linda Blackstone Gallery, Stand B11.

Come and see all the artwork on show; visit us between 15 – 20 September | #LAPADA, Berkeley Square, London, W1.

The Tree of Dreams sculpture was cast by the Morris Singer Foundry.

Don't miss the Collectors’ Preview & Gusbourne Blanc de Blancs Reception on Thursday, 14th September, from 3pm – 8.30pm*

OPENING HOURS:
Friday 15th September 11am – 8pm
Saturday 16th September 11am – 7pm
Sunday 17th September 11am – 7pm
Monday 18th September 11am – 8pm
Tuesday 19th September 11am – 8pm
Wednesday 20th September 11am – 7pm


TICKETS: http://lapadalondon.com/visitors/

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Shakespeare's New Place: One Year On

SculptureJill Berelowitz

Congratulations Shakespeare’s New Place team for a great 1st Anniversary and for reaching 150k visitors!

Shakespeare’s New Place, the newly interpreted site of Shakespeare’s family home for 19 years, celebrated its first anniversary on 20th August 2017.

 

'His Mind’s Eye Tree' created by Jill Berelowitz, in conjunction with The Morris Singer Foundry, stood tall and proud enjoying the view. 

This is where it all began, a year ago.

"Shakespeare’s New Place opened last summer as a major new heritage landmark and cultural destination following a two-year, £6m capital project to re-present the site of Shakespeare’s family home marking the 400th anniversary of his death. Over the past 12 months nearly 150,000 visitors from all over the world have walked through the grand oak and bronze gatehouse to explore the site where Shakespeare’s home once stood, admiring the gleaming contemporary artworks, beautiful gardens and discovering the story of Shakespeare’s adult life through daily talks and trails, and in the exhibition centre. 

Chloe Malendewicz, Manager at Shakespeare’s New Place, said, “New Place is a seamless blend of the historic and the contemporary, offering visitors a complete contrast to anything they will find in Stratford-upon-Avon, or indeed the world. We’ve had a great first year welcoming visitors and local residents, many have returned again and again to enjoy this tranquil little oasis in the heart of Stratford. We have a great day planned and look forward to welcoming visitors and families for what promises to be a fun day of celebrations.” 

New Place serves as a canvas for new and experimental artistic initiatives, including the Garden of Curious A-muse-ments last winter, and several outdoor theatre performances by local and international community groups. There will be an exciting line up of events for visitors to enjoy including outdoor screenings of The Lion King and Omkar - a Bollywood adaptation of Othello as part of the Shakespeare Film Festival, and an immersive winter festival due to take place later this year"  - Shakespeare's New Place Press Release

Mowing Forward | Westminster Reporter, Issue 124/June 2017

Press, SculptureJill Berelowitz

Delighted that 'Moving Forward' was featured in the Westminster Reporter, issue 124/June 2017

'Moving Forward' has a very poignant and positive message for all in 2017 in the UK and worldwide - looking introspective and outward looking. The sculpture was commissioned by Westminster City Council to create an appropriate and suitable sculpture for Park Lane central reservation opposite The Dorchester Hotel and 45 Park Lane (part of the Dorchester International Collection).

Jill has previously worked with Westminster Council in the lead up the the London 2012 Olympics with 'Core Femme' in Cavendish Square. 'Core Femme' is now permanently situated outside Charing Cross Hospitalin Fulham Palace Road.

'His Mind's Eye' | A Video Tour Of Shakespeare's New Place

Press, SculptureJill Berelowitz
Walk in Shakespeare’s footsteps and meet the man behind the works in a fascinating new exhibition. Discover beautiful gardens and specially-commissioned artworks.

Shakespeare’s New Place was his family home from 1597 until he died in the house in 1616.  The house was demolished in 1759, a registered garden has been designed to commemorate the importance of the site and allow visitors to make their own personal connection with Shakespeare.

When Shakespeare bought New Place he was an established playwright and it is believed that he wrote his later plays there, including The Tempest.

Follow in Shakespeare’s footsteps through a new entrance on the site of the original gatehouse and enjoy a contemporary landscape that reveals the footprint of the Shakespeare family home. The re-imagined site gives an impression of the scale of New Place and relationship to the surrounding buildings; such as the neighbouring King Edward VI School and Guild Chapel that were once attended by a young Shakespeare.

 

Commissioned artworks and displays throughout the site evoke a sense of family life and hint at Shakespeare’s major works that were written during the 19 years he owned New Place.

The sunken Knot Garden has been restored in keeping with the original design by Ernest Law. Elements of the Great Garden, the largest surviving part of Shakespeare’s estate, will be conserved and further developed over time. via www.shakespeare.org.uk

'His Mind's Eye' | Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Annual Report

Press, SculptureJill Berelowitz

2016 proved a record-breaking year for the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as we celebrated 400 years of  William Shakespeare's creative genius with the world. We are delighted to see Jill's sculpture prominently featured in the Annual Report (pages 2-3). 

'His Mind's Eye' bronze tree and cosmic sphere evoking the power of Shakespeare's genius was sculpted by Jill and cast in bronze at The Morris Singer Foundry, towering at a height of 4.5 metres sweeping to 5.5 metres and weighing approximately 4.5 ton.

'Moving Forward' | Park Lane, Mayfair, London

Sculpture, ExhibitionJill Berelowitz

Sculpture by Jill Berelowitz
Park Lane, Mayfair, London

MOVING FORWARD
Is everyone’s destination – We welcome a new world – We birth a new humanity together

MOVING FORWARD is both an  inner and an outer journey. It is the creative resolution of body and soul. It is a movement that heals the past and creates the future.  It gives us the opportunity to glimpse ourselves from another’s perspective. Moving forward is an individual and collective awakening that begins from this perfect moment.

This gathering of nine is a visual representation of the archetype of gestation and rebirth. It invokes the inherent pathways within each of us to create and transform. It reminds us of the global momentum as we all participate in birthing a new humanity.

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'His Mind’s Eye' Tree Sculpture Unveiled at Shakespeare’s New Place

Sculpture, ExhibitionJill Berelowitz

On 30th June 2016 the Mind’s Eye Tree sculptured by Jill Berelowitz was unveiled at Shakespeare’s New place.

Towering at a height of 5.5 metres and weighing approximately 3 ton, Jill’s sculpture was cast in bronze at Morris Singer Bronze Foundry.

'DNA Tree of Life' Featured in RHS Chelsea

Sculpture, Exhibition, PressJill Berelowitz

Ann-Marie Powell Gardens – Green Grey Britain – RHS Chelsea 2016 Stand MA 435

Ann-Marie Powell has been chosen by the Royal Horticultural Society to design their official ‘Greening Grey Britain’ garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

“DNA Tree of Life” sculpture by Jill Berelowitz will be featured in the garden.

The power of a tree is drawn from the earth. This is a literal and yet very spiritual interpretation of nature that is borne out of my upbringing within a medical family in South Africa. I address the scientific reasons behind the strength and purpose of a tree by superimposing the readily recognisable structure of DNA over the natural tree form forcing the sculpture upwards away from the earth. The result is a dramatic assemblage of vertical trunks and interwoven branches that erupt at the top as a prescient symbol of the creative potential of genetics. Genealogy also provides a link to the beginnings of life and in particular to a notional Adam & Eve who existed when homo sapiens first emerged in Africa millennia ago. To this extent the branches in DNA Tree are largely made up of conjoined human figures that seemingly dance through the history of the tree’s growth flowing up from a round base, which is emblematic of the “circle of life”.

Whether you’re planning a new garden, renovating an old one, or simply want to change your garden to suit your lifestyle better, our multi award-winning studio, Ann-Marie Powell Gardens can help.

Jill Berelowitz | Press Release September 2015

PressJill Berelowitz

Jill Berelowitz will present two new sculptural works in the atrium of Berkeley Square House, London, in association with ARTful from September 2015 until January 2016. The two works titled DNA Tree and Moving Forward are fine examples of one of London’s most engaging artists’ oeuvre.

For Berelowitz the power of a tree is drawn from the earth. This is a literal and yet very spiritual interpretation of nature that is borne out of her upbringing within a medical family in South Africa. In DNA Tree she is addressing the scientific reasons behind the strength and purpose of a tree by superimposing the readily recognisable structure of DNA over the natural tree form forcing the sculpture upwards away from the earth. The result is a dramatic assemblage of vertical trunks and interwoven branches that erupt at the top as a prescient symbol of the creative potential of genetics. As well as addressing the future in Berelowitz’s words genealogy also provides “a link to the beginnings of life” and in particular to a notional Adam & Eve who existed when homo sapiens first emerged in Africa millennia ago. To this extent the branches in DNA Tree are largely made up of conjoined human figures that seemingly dance through the history of the tree’s growth flowing up from a round base, which Berelowitz describes as emblematic of the “circle of life”.

Also installed at Berkeley Square House is an arrangement of the sculptural group called Moving Forward. The work combines varying numbers of sleek humanoid forms in an unflinchingly positive work whose title enforces this fact. There are a number of different compositions mostly using only two figures but each work is unique and this variation contains seven casts. The humanoid figures are cast individually with no two alike and their gender is implied, if not explicit, this allows the relationships between each figure to be hinted at and for the viewer to perceive the dynamics of the group in their own way. Berelowitz further relinquishes a lot of the control she has as the creator of the work, handing it over to the viewer by allowing the figures to rotate on their bases and be physically interacted with as well as independently perceived. This being said Berelowitz is still responsible for placing the works during an installation period whereby she assesses the space and determines how they should be positioned. This decision can change the emotiveness of the group from sparse alienation to intimidating clique. It is tempting to see a work like this as wistful or nostalgic, as somehow to see each figure as static and entrenched in dire isolation, yet the proximity and fluidity of the figures, independent and yet enthral to another, provides a life-affirming study of humanity. Ultimately this emotion is highlighted by a feature of this installation whereby one of the figures is set away from the group and finished in white bronze contrasting the darker finish of the others. By distinguishing one of the group from the rest Berelowitz draws attention to the individuality of each of them.

Jill Berelowitz was born in 1955 in Johannesburg, South Africa. She developed her passion for art at a very young age and studied from the age of 12 under renowned Finnish artist Karen Jarozynska and then at Johannesburg School of Art. After graduating she set up her own studio in Durban and worked and taught there until moving to London in 1985.

 In London Berelowitz has established herself as one of the City’s most innovative and prominent sculptures. She has monumental works installed outside Charing Cross Hospital and at Henley-on-Thames, and has been commissioned to make the Investec Challenge rugby trophy plus works for the Goldsmith’s Guild, Unilever and Old Mutual. She has been exhibited at Sotheby’s and Christie’s as well as the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, Heathrow Terminal 5 and on Cork Street for Rado and Elizabeth Arden. Other exciting projects also include commissions for Westminster Council’s ‘City of Sculpture’ programme and for the entrance to the London 2012 Olympic Village.

News Flash – Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, New Place Stratford-upon-Avon .

The leading piece, The Mind’s Eye Tree, is being created by Jill Berelowitz

jillberelowitz@mac.com

www.jillberelowitz.com

'DNA Tree of Life' and 'Moving Forward' | Berkeley Square House, Mayfair, London

Press, SculptureJill Berelowitz

Jill Berelowitz is coming to Berkeley Square House, Mayfair London in September 2015. Jill will be displaying “DNA Tree of Life” and “Moving Forward.”

Jill Berelowitz coming to Berkeley Square House W1J

Having met Jill Berelowitz earlier on this year, we are extremely excited to be showcasing her work at one of ARTful’s trophy receptions in the heart of Mayfair, London in September.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1955, Jill Berelowitz studied sculpture, first under Karen Jarozynska and then at the Johannesburg School of Art. In 1989, Jill moved from her native South Africa to London and is one of the capital’s most innovative sculptors, known for her bronze, steel and optical resin works.

Whether pursuing her long-standing passion for the intimacy and movement of the body, or flexibly working to a brief, Jill’s detailed understanding of anatomy and organic form gifts her work with sensual and contemporary appeal. Working closely at the Morris Singer Foundry, her tactile, cast pieces achieve a remarkable finish in bronze, aluminium, stainless steel and optical coloured resin.

Jill’s broad interpretations of life’s cycles and developments from within a solid core run through her diverse sculptural output, suggesting that the female nude is simultaneously a personal and a universal allegory for nothing less than the geography and continuity of humanity. Jill creates work focused on the human form and regeneration wherein bodies are simultaneously solid and abstracted, dynamic and fixed.

A versatile sculptor, Jill has exhibited recently at Sotheby’s, Heathrow Terminal 5 as well as the RHS Chelsea Flower Show for Accenture, at Christie’s, and on Cork Street for Rado and Elizabeth Arden. Jill has also completed many high profile commissions, including ‘Diving Girl’, which was positioned at the entrance to London 2012 the Olympic Village, life-size Pair Oar rowers at Henley on Thames, a rugby trophy for Investec Challenge and most recently a larger than life piece, “Core Femme” & “Old Mutl” in Cavendish Square for the Westminster City of Sculpture Festival.

Jill is also an enthusiastic educator, running a successful teaching studio in Mill Hill, London and also continues to work on ongoing projects and commissions. Follow the link for more information on Jill’s news.

Jill will be displaying “DNA Tree of Life” and “Moving Forward” in the main reception windows of Berkeley Square House, Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London, W1J from the 3rd September 2015-January 2016. They are not to be missed. For any further information contact info@artful.org.uk

SOURCE: Artful.org

Jill’s Mind’s Eye Tree for the New Place Project

Sculpture, PressJill Berelowitz

Jill Berelowitz will be casting the leading piece in conjunction with The Morris Singer Foundry to be featured in the renovated garden at the New Place Project.

'As well as all the building work taking place on site of the New Place Project, we’re also working with some very important artists to create beautiful sculptures to feature in the renovated garden.  Our leading piece, The Mind’s Eye Tree, is being created by Jill Berelowitz, in conjunction with The Morris Singer Foundry.  Together they will be casting a hawthorn tree in bronze metal, as well as using branches found at our own Mary Arden’s Farm.' 

Source: http://www.shakespeareliveshere.co.uk

Moving Forward and Diving Girl | T5 Gallery and Terminal 5 Sofitel Luxury Hotel

Exhibition, SculptureJill Berelowitz

2015 Ongoing Group exhibition

Moving Forward and Diving Girl

Situated in Terminal 5 Heathrow Airport, the T5 Gallery is a unique cultural space within one of the world’s premier airports. As one of the few permanent commercial fine art galleries in the world to be situated in an airport, the T5 Gallery is in an ideal position to reach and introduce art to a wide international audience.

The gallery stages group shows along with an ongoing exhibition programme in association with the Terminal 5 Sofitel luxury hotel.

Meet the Artist Working on Sculpture for New Place

Interview, Press, SculptureJill Berelowitz

"As well as all the building work taking place on site of the New Place Project, we’re also working with some very important artists to create beautiful sculptures to feature in the renovated garden.

Our leading piece, The Mind’s Eye Tree, is being created by Jill Berelowitz, in conjunction with The Morris Singer Foundry.  Together they will be casting a hawthorn tree in bronze metal, as well as using branches found at our own Mary Arden’s Farm. 

The Morris Singer Foundry, which dates back to 1848 are well known for their casting work and are recognised as the oldest fine art foundry in the world. Jill has also designed and created many exciting and memorable sculptures for her previous commissions, including, ‘Diving Girl’, which was placed at entrance for the London 2012 Olympics, and also, the ‘Pair Oar’ rowers, which are permanently on display in Henley-On-Thames.

 

We recently spoke to the pair about their work and here is what was said:

You were one of the first artists we contacted to work on the project. What was your initial reaction to being asked to create a piece to feature in Shakespeare’s New Place?

Morris Singer are greatly honoured at being chosen as the foundry and Jill as the sculptor to be associated with the most recognised and iconic Englishman with worldwide recognition.

Jill, you have created Bronze Trees in previous works of art.  What is it that you find so intriguing about them?

Up until now I have used apple branches as my reference as it symbolises the beginning of time beginning with Adam and Eve which is a celebration of life.  As my trees emerge from the ground, they are symbolic as the Earth Mother and then culminates with dancing tree figures with outstretched arms celebrating life on the branches.

Bronze has always been my first choice of sculpture medium, as with trees, it comes from the earth and will be there for eternity.  It also improves a sculpture with its own persona.

Finally, the Morris Singer Art Foundry have a great tradition of working with metal, what do you think the foundries greatest artistic achievement is to date?

Morris Singer Foundry have created beautiful sculptures over the past 150 years worldwide including the fountains in Trafalgar Square, numerous sculptures by Frampton including Peter Pan, Eros, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and recently Gandhi in Parliament Square by Philip Jackson.

We are extremely excited to be working with both Jill Berelowitz and the Morris Singer Foundry and can’t wait to see the final piece in place. "

Source: www.shakespeare.org 

Core Femme | Innovative sculpture unveiling at Charing Cross Hospital

SculptureJill Berelowitz

The Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust is delighted to announce a new Jill Berelowitz 20 foot high sculpture is to be installed at the entrance of The River Wing of the Charing Cross Hospital.

The sculpture Core Femme is composed of female torsos in bone coloured resin represent stacked vertebrae in this soaring, spinal column and is a towering image of the body’s central element, exemplifying the core through which life’s energy flows.

Jill Berelowitz said: “I am delighted and very honoured to have Core Femme at such a prominent and prestigious location. Core Femme has found her rightful home”

Heathrow Welcomes A Post-Olympic Arrival | The Art Newspaper

PressJill Berelowitz

 

A sculpture from the London Olympics Village has found a temporary new home at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 5. The Diving Girl, 2012, by the Johannesburg-born artist Jill Berelowitz will be splashing down in the terminal’s Expo Gallery tomorrow evening. Although the 3.5m-high bronze sculpture will be a permanent fixture at Heathrow “for the foreseeable future”, according to a spokeswoman, the work is also for sale, number three of nine editions, with a price tag of £35,000. The fate of other works created for the Games, including large-scale works by Marc Quinn and Damien Hirst, remains a mystery. Source: The Art Newspaper

‘Tree of Life’ at the Alon Zakaim Fine Art Gallery

ExhibitionJill Berelowitz

Jill’s ‘Tree of Life’ sculpture is now is now on display until 18th April at the Alon Zakaim Fine Art Gallery on Dover Street

The exhibition will run at 5-7 Dover St. London W1S 4LD from 12 March-18 April 2013. Entry is free, and gallery opening hours are 9am-6pm, Monday-Friday, or by appointment.

Jill Berelowitz Interview | Kensington & Chelsea Magazine

Interview, PressJill Berelowitz

Q&A with Jill Berelowitz about her current sculpture exhibition in Kensington

Q. Was sport the main inspiration for this new group of sculptures?
A. I’m inspired by movement and these now pieces do overlap with athletic movement as I was commissioned to create a Diving Girl for our Olympic Village.
Q. Some of your human figures have attenuated forms in the manner of the late Giacometti: did he influence your work?
A. My figures are inspired by nature, organic shapes and movement but not by Giacometti.
Q. Did your Olympic Village and Heathrow Terminal 5 exhibitions lead to international interest in your work?
A. Yes, international enquiries and new sales and commissions have been generated by those exhibitions and also by my giant spinal sculpture displayed in Cavendish Square, part of Westminster City Council’s festival City of Sculpture.
Q. What future plans do you have in mind for your sculpture?
A. The themes of the cycle of life and regeneration are evolving in my new sculpture and commissions, and I am working with interesting, varied media that include crystal, resin, bronze and stainless steel.